A 9-year-old asked Steph Curry why his shoes aren’t available in girls’ sizes. He made her a promise and kept it.

Photo by Streeter Lecka / Getty Images Last November, we shared the story of how a young girl’s letter to Steph Curry convinced the two-time NBA MVP to create shoes for girls. Now, Curry has made good on his promise. It started when nine-year-old basketball fanatic Riley Morrison from Napa, California went online to pick up a pair of Under Armour Curry 5 shoes, but there weren’t any available in the girls’ section of the site. So she wrote a letter to Curry asking him to create a pair of Curry 5’s for girls. Her father posted the letter to Instagram. View this post on Instagram My daughter’s letter to Steph Curry. Her way of attempting to make a difference. …

This British weatherman interrupted a live debate on crime with a point we all need to hear.

Alex Beresford just couldn’t stay silent while listening to a Good Morning Britain debate about knife crime in the UK. With an increase in knife attacks over the past few years, debates over how to handle knife crime in the United Kingdom are common. Similar to gang-related gun violence in the U.S., the majority of victims and perpetrators of such crimes are black youths living in urban areas. And also like gun violence debates in the U.S., such discussions are too often held without representation from the communities being debated. That fact compelled weatherman Alex Beresford to interject from off camera during a live Good Morning Britain debate on knife crime. Police Federation chair, John Apter, was in the middle …

This hockey player left a game in tears after racist fans taunted him and his family.

It’s 2019, and horrible, blatant racism is still alive and well—even in Canada. Anti-racism activists have gone to great lengths to address systemic, institutional racism and unconscious, implicit racial bias in our society. But those subtler forms of racism are not all that’s left to tackle. Far too often, racism still presents itself with no veils, no pretense, and no shame. Take the story of Jonathan Diaby, a 24-year-old Canadian hockey player who left a game early in tears because racists in the crowd kept taunting him and his family. It’s a story one might expect to hear from the American south in the 1950s, not from seemingly progressive Canada in 2019. And yet, here we are. Diaby said he’d …

The Supreme Court just unanimously voted to stop the police from stealing your stuff for no reason.

via Wikimedia Commons In a landmark unanimous decision issued Wednesday, February 20, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled civil asset forfeiture unconstitutional because it violates the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against excessive fines and fees. Civil asset forfeiture allows local law enforcement agencies to seize people’s cars, cash, homes, and pretty much anything else that is suspected of being used to commit a crime. To get their property back, citizens have to prove it wasn’t obtained illegally, even in situations where no indictment was filed. A few examples of ridiculous government overreach provided by Harvard Law Review: Mary and Leon Adams resided in their West Philadelphia house for forty-six years when the police told them to vacate and initiated a civil …

A pregnant waitress was reduced to tears by an anonymous police officer’s stunning bill.

Courtney English via CBS Philly You rarely hear about a police officer making the news for doing his or her job. In the news, “if it bleeds it leads,” so most of the time we hear about officers there has been a terrible tragedy. That’s why this story out of New Jersey is so important. Courtney English, 23, is nearly eight months pregnant and works on her feet as a waitress at the Lamp Post Diner in Clementon, New Jersey. Although she is unmarried, her father says her boyfriend is supportive, and will play a part in the child’s life. However, making ends meet is a challenge for English and she intends to take six to eight weeks off work …

KFC demoted an employee for wanting to pump at work. She just won a $1.5 million lawsuit against them.

Women have been re-entering the workforce after giving birth for decades now. You would think that employers would know how to treat new moms back on the job, but apparently some people still have a lot of learning to do. When Autumn Lampkins was hired to be an assistant manager at a Delaware Kentucky Fried Chicken just months after giving birth, she was told her new job wouldn’t interfere with her need to pump breastmilk. Instead, it did nothing but interfere. Lampkins claimed the KFC outlet gave her a hard time for wanting (and let’s face it, needing) to pump breast milk during her working hours. Lampkins filed a lawsuit against her former employer, stating she was demoted over it. …